THE VILLAGE OF EDALE

VIEW FROM THE ENTRANCE OF 'STAYING HERE'
STREAM ON ONE OF THE VILLAGE WALKS

1.EDALE is a very historic and picturesque valley in North Derbyshire, situated about 15 miles west of Sheffield, in the heart of the Peak District National Park.  Edale valley is a loose collection of scattered farmsteads or 'booths' as they are known which grew up around the original shelters or 'bothies' used by shepherd when tending their sheep on the hillsides.  There are 5 main ones in Edale valley,  Nether Booth, Ollerbooth Upper Booth, Barber Booth and Grindsbrook Booth of which the village called Edale is part.

BRIDGE AT START OF JACOBS LADDER

 

 

2.EDALE village is in a lovely setting below Kinder Scout a friendly and very lively village with lots of celebration days and village events-Bonfire Night, Jazz in the field, Country Day, Church Fete, Beer Barrel Race and Festival (see the ringing Roger Calendar on the activities page).  Edale is the start of the Pennine Way, the first and longest footpath in England, opened in 1965.

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRACKS

 

 

3.In 1894 the railway was built, the 2 mile long Cowburn tunnel under Colbourne Moor is the 9th longest tunnel in the country.  With the railway came the day trippers and a flourishing tourist industry was started.

EDALE CHURCH NEXT TO 'STAYING HERE'

 

 

4.The buildings are of local gritstone.  Edale village school is still in use today having been built in 1819.  The old Parsonage originally a barn was converted into a house in 1615 and housed the church Minister until a new vicarage was built in 1894.  The Holy and Undivided Trinity church was built in 1885 to a design by William Dawes of Manchester and it is aisle-less.  A chapel did exist here before, but there was a time when villages had to go to Castleton church and carried their dead via Hollins Cross to be buried.

RAMBLERS INN - 5 MINS FROM 'STAYING HERE'

 

 

5.There are 2 pubs in the village of Edale, The Ramblers formerly the Church Inn both have real fires and outside gardens.  They are very popular with walkers and cyclists.

NAGS HEAD-START OF PENNINE WAY

 

 

 

 

6.Also the old Nags Head which is the official start of the Pennine Way.  The old Nags Head was formerly the village blacksmiths.

7. There is also a small post office, and 2 cafes Coopers Cage is where you can get a great breakfast and catch up with some of the villagers.

MOORS ABOVE 'STAYING HERE'

 

 

 

 

8. Kinder Scout at 2088ft is the highest point in Derbyshire and it can be reached by either heading North up Grindsbrook or West up Jacobs ladder.  

KINDER DOWNFALL

 

 

 

9. The two paths rejoin at Kinder Downfall on the Western edge of the plateau, then cross the peat bogs towards Bleaklow.

EDALE MILL

 

 

10. EDALE mill, formerly a cotton mill was built in 1792 and now provides lovely apartments.  The National Trust owns much of the moorland around Edale including most of Kinder Scout.  

UPPER BOOTH FARM

 

 

11. Upper Booth farm is rented from the National Trust and they sell rare breeds meat and really good ice-cream on the farm as well as an information centre in one of their barns, these services are much appreciated by the many ramblers who come here to walk the Pennine Way, which passes through the farm on its way to Jacob's Ladder and Edale Cross.

VIEW FROM BARBER BOOTH

12. Barber Booth is a small settlement squeezed between Broadleebank Tor and a bend in the River Noe as it flows through the valley West to East.

MOORLANDS FOR THE FUTURE OPPOSITE 'STAYING HERE'

13.There is a Moorlands For the Future information centre that houses very interesting information on the surrounding moors and their management for the future.  Built near the start of the Pennine Way, the Moorland Centres design reflects its upland setting.  It has a living roof of sedum turf, intersected by a waterfall tumbling over glass panels into a pool at the entrance.  The turf acts as an eco-friendly insulator, and the building is fueled by an energy-saving ground-source heat pump.  Its work continues towards restoring vast tracts of this threatened habitat, and conserve its heritage.  Interactive exhibitions for all ages are very interesting and there is a wealth of information on attractions, transport and local events available to help and advise on how to make the most of your visit to this beautiful valley of quiet hamlets and dramatic moors.